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Viewing ProtMgr schedules

..at the risk of actually  getting feedback, I'm asking for feedback !

Using the perl interfaces to NetApp's Ontap and DFM SDK, I've written a script that

can display certain protection manager events. It can display individual schedules or schedules attached

to a policy. I have a prototype working and I looking for feedback on what else might go

into the tool or how to better present the output.

Where' the way it works.

> /usr/software/bin/perl sched.pm -h

SYNTAX:
    [-b <date>]  -d <duration> (-s <schedule> | -p <policy>)
     -l (pols | scheds)
     -h | --help

    Arguments definitions are
    -b <date>     : specify the start date 
                  : this argument pair is optional and if not specified then today's date is used
                  : <date> format can be any of
                  : DD          -means a day in current month and year
                  : Mon-DD      -means a month and a day of month in the current year
                  : Mon-DD-YYYY -means a month, day, and year in this existance
                  : DD does not have to be two digits, Mon should be first 3 letters of month
    -d <duration> : specify the length of time
                  : <duration> must be a number between 1 and 100, followed by
                  : d for days
                  : w for weeks
                  : m for months
    -s <schedule> : specify the schedule
                  : <schedule> can be either the sched's name or the sched's DFM ID
    -p <policy>   : specify the policy
                  : <policy> can be either the policy's name or the policy's DFM ID
    -l (pols | scheds) : list policies or list schedules

    Be sure to use quotes around policy or schedule names that have spaces (eg. 'Back up')

OUTPUT format is:      <TIME> <EVENTS>
        Where <TIME> is expressed as MM-DD HH:MM
        and <EVENTS> represents one or more scheduled snapshots for that <TIME>.
        Hourly means an hourly snapshot is schedule. Daily, Wkly, Monthly are the
        other possibilities.

EXAMPLE:
   > sched.pm -b Oct-20 -d 5d -s 'Daily at 8:00 PM'

Here's a couple actual runs of the prototype

### Show 5 days of the 'Daily at 8:00PM' schedule

#

> /usr/software/bin/perl sched.pm -b Oct-20 -d 5d -s 'Daily at 8:00 PM'

                    |   Daily at 8:00 PM    |

===========================
Oct-20 20:00 |         daily,               |
Oct-21 20:00 |         daily,               |
Oct-22 20:00 |         daily,               |
Oct-23 20:00 |         daily,               |
Oct-24 20:00 |         daily,               |

#### Show 2 weeks of a three node policy. I created the policy and used two

#### schedules I created, SimpleDaily and SimpleWeekly

#

> /usr/software/bin/perl sched.pm  -d 2w -p 'Backup, then mirror'

                         Primary Node              Connection 1             Connection 2

                        (SimpleDaily)                (SimpleDaily)            (SimpleWeekly)

===========================================================
Oct-15 09:04 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-15 14:54 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-15 20:44 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-15 22:05 |         daily,                |        daily,                |                             | 
Oct-16 09:04 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-16 14:54 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-16 20:44 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-16 22:00 |                                 |                               |              weekly,     |
Oct-16 22:05 |         daily,                |        daily,                |                             |
Oct-17 09:04 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-17 14:54 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-17 20:44 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-17 22:05 |         daily,                |        daily,                |                             |
Oct-18 09:04 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-18 14:54 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |
Oct-18 20:44 |  hourly,                     | hourly,                     |                             |

.

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The script is currently hardcoded to talk to a specific dfm server with a specific user and password.

Obviously I'll add those as arguments when I publish the script.

Feedback ...

-Marlon

Re: Viewing ProtMgr schedules

Nice script Marlon.  I'm going to expand the question.

We're thinking about changing the Protection Manager schedules to meet some cluster-mode requirements.  I'm curious how people are using ProtMgr schedules today.  Do you create new schedules or use the sample ones?  Do you use all the schedule types?  Are the current schedule objects too flexible or not expressive enough?

What I'd really like for some helpful volunteers to send me a list of the protection policies and schedules you actually use so I can figure out what's valuable and what's not.


Thanks.