ONTAP Discussions

access mount path from windows and linux

adakatsu
684 Views

Hi

I expect to access NetApp storage volumes from Windows and Linux.
Therefore, for the created Volume "Vol1"
I want to access "/Vol1" from Windows and "/mnt/Vol1" from Linux.
Would you please teach me how to do that?


I thought about setting Junction-path, unmounted Vol1, and then
When I try to change Junction-path from Vol1 to /mnt/Vol1, I get the following error:
"Error: command failed: Failed to create or determine if a junction exists within volume" svm_root ".
Error occurred with the remaining junction path of "/mnt/Vol1" for the given path of "/mnt/Vol1"
Reason: Junction create failed (2) "

I also created a volume called mnt and set it to the junction path of mnt.
Then, I was able to set "/mnt/Vol1" to the Junction Pass of "Vol1".
Then, I was able to mount it on "/mnt/Vol1" from Linux, but I couldn't access anything from Windows.

thanks

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

parisi
642 Views

You can't have two different junction paths. 

 

Why do you need to have the path be /mnt/vol1? What's the use case for that? In NFS, all you'd need to do is mount with the following command:

 

#mkdir /mnt/vol1

# mount ontap:/vol1 /mnt/vol1 

 

And then your client would access the storage from /mnt/vol1.

 

The reason you can't simply make /mnt/vol1 the junction path is that /mnt has to exist in ONTAP's namespace. When you created the volume with /mnt as the path, that allowed you to mount to that path within ONTAP.

 

The reason the SMB share failed after that is you likely didn't create a share with /mnt/vol1 as the path. 

 

But ultimately it shouldn't matter what the path is inside ONTAP; what matters is what the client is presented.

 

For SMB, it would be \\ontap\sharename regardless of which path that share points to in ONTAP.

 

For NFS, it would be /vol1 or /mnt/vol1. But it doesn't make sense to create the junction path /mnt/vol1 when you can just create that path on the client if you need that specific path.

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3 REPLIES 3

parisi
643 Views

You can't have two different junction paths. 

 

Why do you need to have the path be /mnt/vol1? What's the use case for that? In NFS, all you'd need to do is mount with the following command:

 

#mkdir /mnt/vol1

# mount ontap:/vol1 /mnt/vol1 

 

And then your client would access the storage from /mnt/vol1.

 

The reason you can't simply make /mnt/vol1 the junction path is that /mnt has to exist in ONTAP's namespace. When you created the volume with /mnt as the path, that allowed you to mount to that path within ONTAP.

 

The reason the SMB share failed after that is you likely didn't create a share with /mnt/vol1 as the path. 

 

But ultimately it shouldn't matter what the path is inside ONTAP; what matters is what the client is presented.

 

For SMB, it would be \\ontap\sharename regardless of which path that share points to in ONTAP.

 

For NFS, it would be /vol1 or /mnt/vol1. But it doesn't make sense to create the junction path /mnt/vol1 when you can just create that path on the client if you need that specific path.

DarrenJ
522 Views

Reverett
512 Views

To be able to have both unix and cifs users access you will need to setup usermapping one way to do this is described in the document below:

 

https://docs.netapp.com/us-en/ontap-sm-classic/nas-multiprotocol-config/task_mapping_unix_windows_user_names.html

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